European Digital Media Observatory launched in Florence to analyse disinformation

The European Digital Media Observatory, which aims to analyse disinformation, was launched in Florence on Monday (1 June). Funded by the EU, it brings together researchers and experts in media literacy. EURACTIV Italy reports.
"With online platforms such as Facebook and Twitter, we will work to create secure access for researchers to research-relevant datasets," said Renaud Dehousse, the president of the European University Institute, within which the EDMO is based. [EPA-EFE/HARISH TYAGI]
“Disinformation is increasingly threatening our democratic societies and we must fight it. In doing so, we will defend [Europe’s] fundamental rights and values, including freedom of expression and information,” European Commissioner for values and transparency, Věra Jourová, said during the launch of the EDMO on Monday.
“It will promote fact-checking and improve our ability to better understand the spread of misinformation online,” she added.
The EDMO is based in Florence, within the European University Institute.
Internal Market Commissioner Thierry Breton said that “the last few months have once again demonstrated the serious and damaging consequences that misinformation can have on our health, our society and our economies”.
“The Observatory will be an important reference point for combating, unmasking, understanding and analysing misinformation activities in Europe,” he said.
The EDMO will examine the reasons behind fake news, as well as the techniques and methods used in online disinformation, through targeted research.
“With online platforms such as Facebook and Twitter, we will work to create secure access for researchers to research-relevant datasets,” said Renaud Dehousse, the president of the European University Institute. Users will be able to access EDMO’s secure platform to check facts and collaborate with other users, Dehousse added.
“We will also provide materials for media education professionals, teachers and citizens to raise awareness of online misinformation, the importance of which has been demonstrated once again by the explosion of [fake news] related to the COVID-19 epidemic,” concluded Dehousse. (EURACTIV's editorial content is independent from the views of our sponsors). 

Comentários

Postagens mais visitadas deste blog

A comunicação na sala de aula

Sites para baixar ou ler livros em espanhol